优乐|平台

  • Thursday, January 10, 2019

    Friction in Cloud Services Contracting

    If I can sign up for your cloud service without human interaction, why do you make me contact your billing department to cancel or downgrade my subscription? 

    This question came to mind after an experience I had this week dealing with a well-known SaaS provider this week. The provider, who will remain unnamed, is well-known in the market for "collaboration."

    Although this provider serves many large companies, it is also a good choice for small work groups, which is how my consulting firm is using this service. There is a free trial version, which will convert to a paid subscription for a nominal per-user fee. As such, without interacting with a human being, you can sign up for a handful of users for an entry level service.

    The experience this week started when our annual billing notice came in and I realized that we were paying for a level of service that was much greater than what we need.  So, I looked at the provider's website to see how to downgrade our level of service.

    The instructions I found read, in effect, "Contact our billing department."

    Now, to the provider's credit, the billing department handled my request in a fairly efficient matter, although of course they wanted to know why I wanted to downgrade, had they done anything wrong, did I realize all the benefits I was receiving, etc., etc. I believe I needed to respond to two, perhaps three, emails in order to accomplish the downgrade.

    So the question remains: Why require this extra step?  If I can sign up via self-service, why can't I downgrade or cancel via self-service?

    Monday, January 07, 2019

    Why Are Median Salaries Falling for Some IT Job Positions?

    Over at Computer Economics, we've just released our new IT Salary Report for 2019, and there are some findings that are a bit counter-intuitive.

    For example, in a time of low unemployment and a strong economy, you would think IT salaries would be strongly rising across the board. But that is not the case. Although across all IT jobs, salaries are rising at the median, for some job positions, the national average salaries are actually falling.

    As we write in a Research Byte for the new report. 
    Another factor we are seeing is that the salaries of new hires are decreasing. This usually does not happen in a strong economy. However, many IT workers are migrating from high-cost-of-living cities to places such as Nevada, Idaho, Oregon, Colorado, North Carolina, and Florida, where they usually earn a lower salary but enjoy a much-lower cost of living. Many employers have also been moving their operations to these same low-cost areas. In terms of real dollars, salaries might not be increasing as quickly, but workers are still seeing benefits.

    “National medians are useful for determining the general direction of the economy or hiring, however this year, more than ever, it is best to look at salaries at a regional level,” said Tom Dunlap, director of research for Computer Economics, based in Irvine, Calif. “As major cities vie to attract employers looking to take advantage of lower costs and new supplies of talent, salaries will be in flux.”  
    In economic analysis, one of the mistakes people make is to fail to recognize the rational decisions that individuals and organizations make in response to incentives (or disincentives). There is no doubt that the cost of living--and the cost of doing business--in some parts of the U.S. have gotten ridiculous. Think of the San Francisco Bay Area, for example.

    As housing prices, and office space lease rates go through the roof, what are the logical choices? For both individuals and companies, it is to relocate to cheaper metropolitan areas--whether it be across the Bay, or out of state to Nevada or Texas. 

    The option of remote work has made this choice much easier. Over the past decade, an increasing percentage of the IT workforce has been working remotely, whether telecommuting a few days a week, or moving out-of-state altogether.

    It used to be that relocation meant turnover. Today, not as much so. For strong performers, employers are often willing to let them relocate and work remotely. The business keeps a strong performer, and the employee sees his or her salary go farther. Or, organizations may relocate to a more cost-effective location and allow many of their employees stay put.

    Ultimately, salaries find their natural level, and that's what we think is going on right now for some IT positions.

    The salary trends introduction to our IT salary report is available at no charge on our website. It also comes with a sample of our salary tables.

    Friday, May 04, 2018

    Big Shift: NetSuite Moving to Oracle Cloud Infrastructure

    In recent years, Oracle has been intensely focused on its cloud strategy as the key to its growth. At Oracle Open World 2016, with the announcement of Oracle’s second-generation cloud infrastructure, Larry Ellison said, “Amazon’s lead is over.” It was an ambitious goal: At the time, Oracle’s cloud infrastructure (OCI) business was bringing in less than $200M per quarter.

    Uptake of Oracle’s cloud applications is great, but when it comes to Oracle really competing with Amazon or Microsoft as a platform for independent software vendors (ISVs), the story is different.

    The absence of multitenant ISVs on OCI is not because of a lack of capabilities. Oracle’s flagship database, since v12c was released in 2013, has built-in multitenancy in the form of database containers, which allow multiple tenants to share a single Oracle database, with individual containers assigned to each tenant. This approach puts the multitenancy into the infrastructure layer, allowing developers to focus their efforts on application development, not on the mechanics of multitenancy.

    Oracle’s lack of commercial SaaS providers building on OCI is about to change.

    Read the rest of this post on the Strativa blog:
    NetSuite on Oracle Cloud Infrastructure: What It Means for Customers

    Friday, April 20, 2018

    Enterprise Software Vendors Putting AI within Reach

    To gain the attention of customers, prospects, and analysts, enterprise software vendors are always on the hunt for the next big thing. During the past decade, social networking, mobile apps, the Internet of Things, and data analytics have all filled this need. But during the past year or so, their attention has shifted to artificial intelligence.
     
    When we hear the term artificial intelligence (AI), most of us immediately think of the AI we encounter in our personal lives: web ads based on our search history, facial recognition on Facebook, or the interactive voice response systems of our banks or insurance companies. Or, maybe we think of personal digital assistants, such as Siri (Apple), Alexa (Amazon), or Cortana (Microsoft). In other words, we all use AI on a personal level, whether we call it AI or just expect it to be part of our everyday experience as consumers.

    Just as social networking and smartphones took hold first in the consumer world and then moved into business, we can also expect artificial intelligence to begin to move into business applications in a natural way.

    Today, nearly every large enterprise software vendor, and many of the smaller ones, are working to embed AI capabilities into the core of their business software. Here are examples from just three of them.

    Read the rest of this post by Dee Long on the Strativa blog: AI Coming Soon to a Business System Near You

    Wednesday, January 03, 2018

    Change Management Doesn’t Have to Be a Game of Chance

    Too often, in carrying out new initiatives, business leaders can be very focused on getting the technical details right, while neglecting the people-side of the change.

    For example, with ERP implementations we see companies investing the time and energy to select the right system but spend no time at all to ensure that the people who have to use the system buy in to the decision.

    Then they wonder why, when it is time to start the implementation, employees resist moving to the new system.

    Why do business leaders too often neglect the people-side of change? It is usually because they think of change management as something intangible, something that they cannot control, measure, or track. They know how to develop a project plan for technical implementation of a new initiative (for example, an ERP system), but they don’t know how to develop a plan with tangible and practical steps to help people embrace the new system. They know how to manage projects, but not how to manage change.

    It is not for lack of talk about change management. The same business leaders have shelves full of books about change management, cultural change, and leadership. But too much of what has been written about change management is theoretical. After reading the book, the leader still doesn’t know what to do in terms of practical steps to take care of the people-side of change.

    A real change management program is not something soft or nebulous. After years of research and real-world experiences, change management professionals have developed many methods and tools that can make change management as tangible and practical as project management.

    Read the rest of this post on the Strativa blog:
    Change Management Doesn’t Have to Be a Game of Chance

    Wednesday, October 18, 2017

    In Vendor Evaluation, Don’t Shortcut the RFI Process

    In some enterprise software selection projects, clients are tempted to skip the Request for Information (RFI) stage and go straight to a Request for Proposal (RFP). This is a mistake and often the result of not fully understanding the value of a well-written RFI.

    What is the difference between an RFI and an RFP? In our software selection consulting services, we develop an RFI near the beginning of the vendor evaluation process. The RFI includes a description of the client’s organization and the client’s project. It also includes a list of key requirements for the new system—not an exhaustive list, but essential functionality or processes that are distinctive for the client. Vendors are asked to respond as to their ability to satisfy those key requirements. Vendors are not asked for a cost proposal at this time. We typically make the RFI available to as many vendors as we think are qualified to respond, or to those that express an interest in responding—usually five or more.

    An RFP, in contrast, is published near the end of the evaluation process, after each finalist vendor (typically 2-3) has conducted its demonstrations or other proof-of-concept. The vendors are asked to provide a cost proposal, along with their proposed license/subscription agreements and a high-level implementation proposal with costs and schedules. The vendors’ RFI responses are incorporated as an attachment, which they can revise based on what they’ve learned since they first responded to the RFI.

    Read the rest of this post on the Strativa blog: In Vendor Evaluation, Don’t Shortcut the RFI Process

    Friday, June 16, 2017

    Strategies for Dealing with Legacy Systems

    Developing an IT strategy for some organizations can be difficult because of the presence of a legacy system. Legacy systems that are old, out-of-date, and difficult to maintain are a huge obstacle to innovation. As a result, business leaders become increasingly frustrated by their inability to roll out new mobile apps, connect with customers, analyze business performance, or become a digital business.

    In recent years, it has become popular to describe organizations with an out-of-date legacy system as being in “technical debt.” I would take this a step further. If an organization ignores the need to update the system for too long, it can lead to what I refer to as “technical bankruptcy.”

    We can define technical bankruptcy as a situation where the organization cannot, or finds it exceedingly difficult to, pay off the technical debt. It does not mean that the organization is in financial bankruptcy but rather that its systems are broken or held together in a way that makes them extremely difficult to upgrade.

    Significant Percentage of Organizations Are at Risk of Technical Bankruptcy

    In work with our clients at Strativa over the past several years, we have gained new insights into challenges facing organizations that have out-of-date legacy systems. We recently took the opportunity to combine those insights with survey data from our sister IT research firm, Computer Economics, to produce a new report, Avoiding Technical Bankruptcy in Legacy Systems. (Click the link to download the report free from the Strativa website.)

    Figure 3 from the full report shows the magnitude of the problem as it applies to ERP systems. A small but significant percentage (7%) of organization have not upgraded their ERP systems for 10 or more years. These are likely to already be in technical bankruptcy. But the 13% of organizations that have not upgraded their systems in the five-to-nine-year time frame are in the danger zone: Technical debt is building, and if the organization does not undertake a major upgrade, it risks falling into technical bankruptcy.

    Signs of Technical Bankruptcy

    What are typical signs that a legacy system has reached the stage of technical bankruptcy? We found five characteristics:
    • Extensive modifications, extensions, and interfaces.
    • Poor understanding of the system by users and IT alike
    • Direct involvement of IT personnel in business processes.
    • Legacy system atrophy as shadow IT emerges.
    • Upgrade or replacement hard to justify.
    In the full report, we explore the symptoms of technical bankruptcy and the devastating effects that it has on the organization. We continue by quantifying the scope of the problem specifically for ERP systems, using our research on the typical age, frequency of upgrades, and extent of modification of these systems.

    Most importantly, we conclude with recommendations on how to avoid technical bankruptcy and, for organizations that have reached this stage, strategies for getting out and staying out of technical bankruptcy going forward.  

    Download the full report, free from the Strativa website:
    IT Strategies for Legacy Systems: Avoiding Technical Bankruptcy.
     


    Bonus: Watch a Datamation's James McGuire in a video interview with me about the report.

    Thursday, June 08, 2017

    Manufacturing Is a Huge Opportunity for Cloud ERP

    In many markets for enterprise software, the battle between cloud and on-premises (or hosted) systems is over. Salesforce, the market leader in CRM, will soon pass the $10 billion mark in annual revenue. Workday, with its cloud HCM offering and growing financial management applications, expects to hit the $2 billion mark in 2018. Traditional Tier I providers, SAP and Oracle, are certainly not out of the race. But the only way they have been able to compete is by building, or buying, their own cloud services for CRM and HCM. Cloud has won.

    Nevertheless, there is no cloud ERP provider the size of Salesforce or Workday, and there is certainly no cloud ERP provider for the manufacturing industry with that scale. NetSuite was founded in 1998, around the same time as Salesforce. But it only reached the $741 million revenue mark in 2015, before being acquired by Oracle. Claiming more than 30,000 companies, organizations, and subsidiaries in more than 100 countries as customers, it is by far the largest cloud ERP provider. Although it has done very well with professional services firms, software companies, and other services-related businesses, manufacturing companies form only a small part of that number. Plex Systems has a pure cloud ERP system for manufacturers dating from 2000 and has been rapidly growing over the past four or five years. But its customer count is under 600. After NetSuite and Plex, the number falls significantly: Cloud-only systems such as SAP’s Business ByDesign, Rootstock, and Kenandy,  each have even fewer manufacturing customers.

    To understand how great the market opportunity is for cloud ERP in manufacturing, consider that, according to the U.S. Census, there were about 63,000 manufacturing firms in the United States in 2014 with 20 or more employees, as shown in Figure 1. Considering that the estimated customer counts by vendor in the preceding paragraph include customers outside of the U.S.,  it is safe to say that manufacturing cloud ERP probably has less than 2% market share in the U.S. The market opportunity going forward, therefore, is enormous.

    Read the rest of this post on the Strativa blog: Manufacturing Is a Huge Opportunity for Cloud ERP

    Thursday, May 04, 2017

    Software Vendor Implementation Services Not Always Best Choice

    In our software selection consulting, clients often seek our advice on implementation partners. In fact, our experience over several decades tells us that the choice of an implementation team is as important, sometimes more important, than the choice of a new system.

    In choosing an implementation consulting group, clients often start out thinking that it’s best to choose the vendor’s own professional services group. They think that no one can know the software as well as the vendor’s own personnel. They think that when problems arise, the vendor’s consultants will be in a better position to deal with the software vendor. They also think that there will be less finger-pointing: the consultants blaming the vendor, or the vendor blaming the consultants.

    These considerations have merit. But there are other factors to consider, factors that may make an implementation partner, or even an independent consulting firm, a better choice.

    Read the rest of this post on the Strativa blog:
    Software Vendor Implementation Services Not Always Best Choice.

    Thursday, February 09, 2017

    Three Things to Like about Acumatica

    Since the turn of the century, there has been an ongoing ERP consolidation trend, with Oracle, Infor, Epicor, and others buying up smaller ERP providers. During this same period, newer ERP vendors have risen up to challenge the incumbents. Nearly all of the new entrants are cloud ERP systems.

    One of the most interesting of these is Seattle-area-based Acumatica, founded in 2008—just yesterday in “ERP years.” Like many other ERP startups, it initially focused on services businesses but soon added distribution and CRM functionality to its horizontal capabilities. Its go-to-market strategy is 100% through value-added resellers (VARs), who can add their own industry-specific software on top of Acumatica. Its VAR strategy, in this respect, is similar to that of Microsoft Dynamics and Sage. In fact, many of the new VARs in Acumatica’s channel program have come from the Microsoft and Sage ecosystems.

    Acumatica’s partner and customer conference in January gave us an opportunity to update our view of this emerging cloud ERP provider. We find that Acumatica is interesting because of three characteristics that are somewhat novel in the ERP world.

    Continue reading on the Strativa blog: Three Things to Like about Acumatica
  • 球探比分即时足球比分

    好球足球比分

    皇冠足球足球比分

    黄金8彩票登录网址

    宏发的彩的网登陆网址网

    同乐城国际

    博久彩票

    直播足球的网站

    禾盛平台 娱乐