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  • Showing posts with label CRM. Show all posts
    Showing posts with label CRM. Show all posts

    Wednesday, January 16, 2019

    Why Is Open Source Not More Successful for Enterprise Applications?

    Although open source software now completely dominates some categories of software, this has not been true for enterprise applications, such as ERP or CRM. What is it about enterprise applications that makes them so resistant to open source as a business model? 

    My friend and fellow-analyst Holger Mueller has a good post on Why Open Source Has Won, and Will Keep Winning.  Read the whole thing. In Holger's view, which I agree with, the battle between open source and propriety software is over, and open source won. In just a short fifteen years or so, it is hard to find any commercial software vendor attempting to build new platforms based on proprietary code. He writes:
    Somewhere in the early 2000s, Oracle dropped its multi-year, 1000+ FTE effort of an application server… to use Apache going forward… that was my eye opener as a product developer. My eye opener as an analyst was in 2013, when IBM’s Danny Sabbah shared that IBM was basing its next generation PaaS, BlueMix, on CloudFoundry… so, when enterprise software giants cannot afford to out-innovate open source platforms, it was clear that open source war-winning. As of today, there is no 1000+ people engineering effort for platform software that has started (and made public) built inhouse and proprietary by any vendor. The largest inhouse projects that are happening now in enterprises, the NFV projects at the Telco’s, are all based on open source.
    Holger's observation is certainly true for software at the platform or infrastructure level of the technology stack. All the examples that Holger cites, and nearly any other that he could cite, are in these categories.

    But what about enterprise business applications, such as ERP or CRM. One of the best examples is SugarCRM, but even there, it lags far behind the market leaders. Open source ERP is in even worse shape. Players such as Compiere (now owned by Consona), Adempiere (a fork of Compiere), Opentaps (an ERP and CRM system), xTuple (formerly, OpenMFG), and Odoo (formerly, OpenERP) barely move the needle in terms of market share. Where is the Linux of ERP?

    Since the early 2000s, I have been hoping that open source would catch on as an alternative to the major enterprise apps vendors, such as SAP, Oracle, Microsoft, Infor, and others. I would like to see open source as a counterweight to the major vendors, putting more market power on the side of buyers. 

    So, why hasn't open source been more of a contender in enterprise applications?  I can think of three factors, for a start.
    1. Open source needs a large set of potential users. But enterprise applications do not have as broad a potential user base as infrastructure software. Although the ERP market is huge, when you break it down by specific industries, it is small compared to the market for, say, Linux.
       
    2. Enterprise apps require a large effort in marketing and sales. Buyers put great weight on name recognition. But open source projects do not generally show much interest in the sales and marketing side of a business. If a project is truly community-developed, who is interested in marketing it? As a result, very few people know what Odoo is, for example, let alone, how to acquire it.
       
    3. Open source is labor-intensive. It is great for organizations that have time but no money. My impression is that open source ERP adoption is somewhat more successful in some developing countries, where there are very smart people with good technical skills willing to spend the time to implement a low-cost or no-cost solution. Here in the U.S., such companies are rare. Most would rather write a check. 
    Ironically, open source is very popular among enterprise application providers themselves. Software vendors, whether cloud or on-premises providers, love open source and many now build nearly all of their systems on it, because it scales economically. Yet, when they sell their own enterprise applications, the last thing they want to do is offer them as open source.

    So, why hasn't open source been more successful for enterprise applications? Perhaps readers can come up with other reasons. Please leave a comment on this post, or tweet me (@fscavo), or email me (my email is in the right hand column).

    Update, Jan. 18: My friend Josh Greenbaum has posted a lengthy response on his blog, here: Open Source, Enterprise Software, and Free Lumber. Please read the whole thing, as it is quite thoughtful.

    Josh agrees that open source software (OSS) has been more successful for infrastructure components than for enterprise applications. But he goes off in a different direction to argue that it's not right for commercial software vendors to make money from their use of OSS. I have two basic disagreements with Josh on this point. First, most OSS licenses (GNU, for example) mandate that creation of software incorporating the OSS must be provided under the same OSS license. So commercial software providers go to great lengths to ensure that their developers do NOT incorporate OSS into their software products. Now, OSS providers CAN incorporate OSS in their own operations (e.g. use of Linux or MariaDB in their provision of cloud services), and they can include OSS as a supported platform.. In both cases they are not violating the terms of the OSS license.

    My second disagreement is that Josh objects to OSS on what I consider to be more or less moral grounds, that it is wrong for others to make money from the free contributions of others (a "sucker's game," he calls it). Putting aside the fact that commercial software providers (think, IBM, Microsoft, Facebook, Google, and hundreds of others) are the largest contributors by far to OSS, no one is holding a gun to the head of any individual developer forcing him or her to work for free. If OSS contributors find it acceptable for others to make free use of their labors, who am I to say that it is wrong for others to do so? The fact that OSS has been wildly successful (at least for infrastructure-like components) tells us that there must be something in the economic model of open source that works to benefit both contributors and users of OSS.

    Update, Jan 18: Some email correspondence from my friend Vinnie Mirchandani, led me to send this email reply, lightly edited here:
    Yes, the large tech vendors, such as Google, Microsoft, IBM, etc., have benefited enormously from open source, but they also contribute enormously to open source projects, because it is in their best interest to do so. You know that IBM contributed key IP from its decades-old work in virtualization. Microsoft open sourced Visual Studios Code, and it is now one of the most widely-adopted development environment. Oracle, IBM, and others contribute to Linux because it ensures that it runs on and is optimized for their hardware. They all contribute because it is in their self interest to do so. Moreover, senior open source developers, especially those who have commit-privileges, are in high demand and are often hired by these same large tech companies. So the whole open source movement has become a virtuous ecosystem where everyone benefits.

    Update, Jan 19: Over at Diginomica, Dennis Howlett riffs on our discussion in, Why you should take notice of the open source in enterprise suckers conundrum. On my question of why open source has not been more successful in enterprise applications, he points to the lack of real marketing and sales efforts. He writes:
    I’d go one step further and as a nuanced view of Frank’s (2) element. In most cases, enterprise software is sold, it’s not bought. What I mean is that troupes of vendor reps, marketers and other hangers on line up to convince you about taking on one or other solution. In the open source world you are ‘buying’ not being sold. There is no real money for marketing and sales. You either take it (for free) and then work on it yourself, or you enlist the help of specialists who both understand your processes and the software code itself. And despite the early success of Salesforce as a cloud vendor from whom you bought applications at the departmental level on your credit card, the majority of enterprise deals are sold.

    Thursday, June 08, 2017

    Manufacturing Is a Huge Opportunity for Cloud ERP

    In many markets for enterprise software, the battle between cloud and on-premises (or hosted) systems is over. Salesforce, the market leader in CRM, will soon pass the $10 billion mark in annual revenue. Workday, with its cloud HCM offering and growing financial management applications, expects to hit the $2 billion mark in 2018. Traditional Tier I providers, SAP and Oracle, are certainly not out of the race. But the only way they have been able to compete is by building, or buying, their own cloud services for CRM and HCM. Cloud has won.

    Nevertheless, there is no cloud ERP provider the size of Salesforce or Workday, and there is certainly no cloud ERP provider for the manufacturing industry with that scale. NetSuite was founded in 1998, around the same time as Salesforce. But it only reached the $741 million revenue mark in 2015, before being acquired by Oracle. Claiming more than 30,000 companies, organizations, and subsidiaries in more than 100 countries as customers, it is by far the largest cloud ERP provider. Although it has done very well with professional services firms, software companies, and other services-related businesses, manufacturing companies form only a small part of that number. Plex Systems has a pure cloud ERP system for manufacturers dating from 2000 and has been rapidly growing over the past four or five years. But its customer count is under 600. After NetSuite and Plex, the number falls significantly: Cloud-only systems such as SAP’s Business ByDesign, Rootstock, and Kenandy,  each have even fewer manufacturing customers.

    To understand how great the market opportunity is for cloud ERP in manufacturing, consider that, according to the U.S. Census, there were about 63,000 manufacturing firms in the United States in 2014 with 20 or more employees, as shown in Figure 1. Considering that the estimated customer counts by vendor in the preceding paragraph include customers outside of the U.S.,  it is safe to say that manufacturing cloud ERP probably has less than 2% market share in the U.S. The market opportunity going forward, therefore, is enormous.

    Read the rest of this post on the Strativa blog: Manufacturing Is a Huge Opportunity for Cloud ERP

    Monday, January 23, 2017

    New Customer-Facing Systems Extend the Reach of Small, Midsize Businesses

    Small businesses play a vital role in the economy and are often the leading innovators in new products and services. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, organizations with fewer than 500 workers account for over 99% of businesses, and companies with fewer than 20 workers make up nearly 90%.

    But small business doesn’t always mean simple business. Like larger companies, small and midsize businesses (SMBs) need to reach new markets, develop new products, satisfy customers, and control costs. The main difference is that SMBs need to do these things with fewer resources.

    In recent years, however, software vendors have announced new products to address the challenges facing small businesses. This post outlines two of them.

    Read the rest of this post by Strativa consultant Dee Long: New Customer-Facing Systems Extend the Reach of Small, Midsize Businesses

    Thursday, March 13, 2014

    Microsoft Broadens Dynamics CRM, Moves Up-Market

    With three strategic acquisitions, Microsoft Dynamics CRM can now be considered a complete offering for sales, marketing and customer service. In addition, Microsoft’s CRM offering is showing its ability to move up-market into large enterprises.

    These were two points that I took away from the Microsoft Dynamics Convergence conference last week in Atlanta, GA.

    By way of history, Microsoft introduced its Dynamics CRM product in 2003, its first Dynamics product written from scratch, though it did not experience significant market uptake until several years later. Until the past year or so, Dynamics CRM was largely a salesforce automation system, with a bit of case management on the service side. As such, it was not well positioned against the CRM offerings of SAP and Oracle, which offered complete solutions. Though Salesforce.com also started as a sales automation system, over the past few years it has also built out its capabilities for marketing and customer service.

    I saw the deficiencies of Dynamics CRM up close in 2010, when my consulting firm, Strativa, facilitated a CRM selection for a midsize high tech manufacturer. The company had actually implemented Dynamics CRM but decided to abandon it for lack of customer service functionality. In another CRM selection deal, in 2012, we didn’t even short list Dynamics CRM because of its lack of support for marketing and customer service.

    Filling out the Footprint

    But now, as the result of three strategic acquisitions, the picture is completely different:
    • Marketing Pilot: Acquired in 2012, Marketing Pilot is the basis for the newly announced Microsoft Dynamics Marketing. Product capabilities include campaign management, content management, approval workflow, media planning, email marketing management, and integration with sales force automation. The product also supports multichannel marketing, with social media management (e.g. automated posting to Facebook and Twitter) and digital advertising (e.g. integration with Google Adwords). With the latest version of Dynamics CRM, the product is completely integrated, with a consistent user-interface.
       
    • NetBreeze: This acquisition by Microsoft in 2013 allows organizations to monitor social media conversations of interest to the organization’s brands. It also provides “sentiment analysis” on social media conversations. In other words, are people speaking positively or negatively about the brand?

      Microsoft executives claim that Netbreeze is the only provider that does such sentiment analysis in native languages (five, at present). This, they say, is in contrast to competing offerings, which have to translate tweets (for example) into English, and perform the sentiment analysis on the translation. Anyone who has attempted to use Google Translate or Bing's translation engine to communicate in a foreign language knows the dangers of relying on machine translation. Netbreeze now forms the heart of the newly announced Microsoft Social Listening.
       
    • Parature: This most-recent acquisition, in 2014, brought a complete customer service solution into the Dynamics CRM product set, addressing a deficiency I wrote about last year. Parature, built exclusively in the cloud, supports customer self-service, knowledge management, issue management, and service workflow. The product is built with multi-channel in mind, with support for call center, web self-service, text chat, and social media channels.

      Parature is the basis for Microsoft’s newly announced Unified Service Desk. In a subsequent interview with Microsoft’s Bill Patterson, who has now been named Senior Director over the Parature operation, he indicated that Parature really doesn’t need much help to build out more functionality or even to integrate it with Dynamics CRM. The focus, he said, will be more on execution, raising its profile in the market, scaling its business operations globally, and training partners to sell and support it. Interestingly, Microsoft currently has no plans to migrate Parature from Amazon Web Services to its own Azure cloud. The product will interoperate with the rest of Dynamics CRM, no matter if the customer is running on premises or with Microsoft or partner hosting.
    These capabilities fill out Dynamics CRM into a complete offering, although there are still partner products needed in some cases, for example, for field service, which Microsoft views more as an ERP function than a CRM function. Partner solutions are also needed for configuration, pricing, and quoting (CPQ).

    Competing on Value

    Although Dynamics CRM can now position itself well in terms of capabilities, there is also an economic angle to its market strategy. Microsoft is simplifying licensing for Dynamics CRM and releasing much of the new capabilities at no additional charge. Specifically, for Microsoft-hosted deployments, which comprise the majority of new deals for Dynamics CRM:
    • CRM Online Professional, priced at $65 per user per month for customers with 10 or more Professional users, will give users access to Social Listening at no additional charge. For on-premises customers (the minority of new sales), there will be a $20 per user per month charge. 
       
    • CRM Online Enterprise, priced at $200 per user per month, essentially delivers the whole enchilada: the core sales functionality, plus Dynamics Marketing, Social Listening, plus the new Unified Service Desk.

    It will take one or two actual CRM deals to see how the new pricing and licensing works in practice, but as it stands it appears to be quite competitive. Buyers may find the pricing attractive against a similar bundle from Salesforce.com, where costs can rise quickly as Sales Cloud, Marketing Cloud, and Service Cloud are priced separately. Throw in a few AppExchange solutions and the total price can be quite steep. Of course, large customers can and do negotiate significant discounts. Still, Microsoft’s offer of a complete CRM solution at a reasonable price should work to limit the premium pricing ambitions of Salesforce as well as Oracle and SAP. And, that’s good for buyers.

    A more complete run down on the CRM pricing and licensing can be found in a Microsoft blog post by Paco Contreras. 

    Moving Up-Market

    The expanded CRM footprint will certainly help Microsoft compete for CRM deals in larger enterprises. However, Dynamics CRM was already moving up-market even before these most recent announcements.

    During Convergence, I had a chance to sit down with Patrick Berard, Senior VP Southern Europe at Rexel France. Though not a household name in the US, Rexel is a $18 billion distributor of electrical supplies, operating in 30 countries worldwide. Starting three years ago with its operations in France, Rexel implemented Dynamics CRM to provide a 360 degree view of its customers. It may not sound exciting except that Rexel, having grown through many acquisitions in various markets, has dozens of ERP and other transactional systems that contain customer information, in multiple languages. Bringing this information together for the first time in a single view was no small feat.

    Rexel’s approach was not to disturb these transactional systems but to pull information from them into Dynamics CRM and make it available for real time display on desktops and mobile devices and to use it for sales force automation. The company also leverages Microsoft Lync and Yammer to create communities of interest around this customer information.

    As good a case study as this is, Rexel may not be finished implementing Microsoft Dynamics. With Microsoft building out its CRM footprint, Berard plans to look at Dynamics Marketing to see whether it would provide a way to better manage technical specifications and other content. Finally, some of the ERP systems in Rexel operating units are “sub-standard” and candidates for replacement. Microsoft Dynamics AX may be a good fit for these divisions, which may lead to an even broader commitment to Microsoft throughout Rexel.

    For a system that was only born 10 years ago, Microsoft has made great progress in building out a complete CRM offering. It positions well against SAP CRM as a smaller-footprint alternative. Against Oracle, Dynamics CRM has a simpler story to tell. There’s no doubt that Oracle has deep CRM capabilities, but they come in a variety of acquired products, such as Siebel, Rightnow, and Eloqua, as well as Oracle-developed products, such as Oracle Fusion CRM.

    Against all competitors, including the market leader, Salesforce.com, Microsoft is signaling that it is willing to challenge their premium pricing.

    With Microsoft now offering a complete CRM solution and demonstrating that it can scale up-market, there are few situations now where Dynamics CRM does not deserve consideration.

    Related Posts

    Microsoft Dynamics Move Up-Market: What's Missing? 
    Four Needs Pushing Microsoft Dynamics into Large Enterprises
    Computer Economics: Microsoft Dynamics Stepping onto Enterprise Turf
    Update on Microsoft Dynamics Products and Plans

    Monday, July 30, 2012

    2012 Technology Trends: Call for Survey Respondents

    Over at Computer Economics, we've now launched our 2012 Technology Trends survey, and we're looking for qualified IT executives to take a 15-minute survey about their technology investment plans.

    What's in it for you? If you complete the survey, we'll send you a complete copy of the final report (a $995 value).


    In this year's survey we're asking about your organization's adoption and experience with 13 technologies:
    • ERP
    • Customer Relationship Management (CRM)
    • Supply Chain Management
    • Human Resources Management Systems (HRMS)
    • Data Warehouse/BI
    • Social Business/Collaboration Systems
    • Legacy System Renewal
    • Software as a Service (SaaS)
    • Public Cloud Infrastructure (IaaS)
    • Platform as a Service (PaaS)
    • Unified Communications
    • Desktop Virtualization
    • Tablet Computers. 
    Want to know more? See a summary of the final report from last year.

    Monday, June 11, 2012

    Oracle's List of 100-Plus Cloud Applications

    Oracle has now responded to analyst requests for a list of the 100+ cloud applications that Larry Ellison claimed in his Oracle Cloud presentation last week. I've just checked, and his exact words were "Over 100 enterprise-grade applications running in the cloud."

    But the email cover for the list sent this morning refers to them as "100+ application services." As I speculated last week, Oracle is defining "application services" at very fine-grained level, almost down to individual programs.

    For example, within "Oracle Fusion Customer Relationship Management - Marketing" is "Fusion Marketing Segmentation - up to 500,000 records" really a separate and distinct application from "Fusion Marketing Segmentation - up to 1,000,000 records?"

    Update 1: Upon further review, I'm wondering why Oracle CRM On-Demand, a multi-tenant SaaS application, is missing from Oracle's list.

    Update 2: I'm also wondering, using Oracle's definition of "applications," how many does SAP have?  In his presentation, Ellison said, "SAP only has SuccessFactors." Leaving aside my point that Ellison did not credit Business By Design or SAP's line of business applications as cloud apps, how does "SuccessFactors" count as one application, but Oracle's Taleo counts as 24 (see list below)?


    Here is the complete list of what Oracle claims as its 100+ cloud applications:

    Oracle RightNow

    Oracle RightNow Dynamic Agent Desktop Cloud Service: Seats
    Oracle RightNow Standard Dynamic Agent Desktop Cloud Service
    Oracle RightNow Enterprise Dynamic Agent Desktop Cloud Service
    Oracle RightNow Enterprise Contact Center Dynamic Agent Desktop Cloud Service
    Oracle RightNow Standalone Chat Dynamic Agent Desktop Cloud Service
    Oracle RightNow Dynamic Agent Knowledgebase Cloud Service
    Oracle RightNow Chat Cloud Service
    Oracle RightNow Cobrowse Cloud Service
    Oracle RightNow Cobrowse Remote Support Cloud Service
    Oracle RightNow Contextual Workspaces Cloud Service
    Oracle RightNow Guided Assistance Cloud Service
    Oracle RightNow Agent Scripting Cloud Service
    Oracle RightNow Desktop Workflow Cloud Service
    Oracle RightNow Product Registration Cloud Service
    Oracle RightNow Social Monitor Cloud Service

    Oracle Taleo

    Taleo Enterprise Cloud Service Platform
    Taleo Platform Cloud Service
    Taleo Analytics Cloud Service
    Taleo Recruiting Cloud Service
    Taleo Recruiting High Volume Cloud Service
    Taleo Onboarding Cloud Service
    Taleo Performance Management Cloud Service
    Taleo Goal Management Cloud Service
    Taleo Succession Planning Cloud Service
    Taleo Development Planning Cloud Service
    Taleo Learn Cloud Service
    Taleo Learn External User Cloud Service

    Taleo Enterprise Recruiting Assessment Content
    Taleo Hourly Assessment Content Cloud Service
    Taleo Store Manager Assessment Content Cloud Service
    TBE Recruiting Standard Active User Cloud Service
    TBE Recruiting Premium Active User Cloud Service
    TBE Recruiting Manager Cloud Service

    Taleo Business Edition - Per Employee
    TBE Recruiting Premium Cloud Service
    TBE Smart Sourcing Base Cloud Service
    TBE Smart Sourcing Per Posting Cloud Service
    TBE Onboarding Cloud Service
    TBE Compensation Cloud Service
    TBE Performance Management Cloud Service

    Taleo Business Edition - Learn
    TBE Learn Cloud Service
    TBE Learn External Trainees Cloud Service

    Oracle ATG

    Oracle ATG Live Help
    Live Help Interactions On Demand
    Live Help Chat On Demand
    Live Help Email On Demand
    Live Help Cobrowse Chat On Demand
    Live Help Cobrowse Phone On Demand
    Recommendations Single-Channel On Demand
    Recommendations Multichannel On Demand
    Recommendations Additional Catalog On Demand
    Recommendations Large Catalog On Demand

    Oracle Fusion Applications

    Oracle Fusion CRM Base Cloud Service
    Fusion CRM Base Standard Offering Cloud Service
    Fusion CRM Base Enterprise Offering Cloud Service
    Fusion CRM Base Premium Offering Cloud Service
    Fusion Transactional Business Intelligence for Customer Relationship Management Cloud Service
    Fusion Enterprise Contracts Management Base Cloud Service
    Fusion Incentive Compensation Cloud Service
    Fusion Opportunity Landscape Cloud Service
    Fusion Quota Management Cloud Service
    Fusion Sales Campaigns Cloud Service
    Fusion Sales Predictor Cloud Service

    Oracle Fusion Marketing Cloud Service
    Fusion Marketing, Enterprise Edition Cloud Service
    Fusion Marketing, Additional Volume Cloud Service
    Fusion Marketing, Additional Email - 500,000 Messages

    Oracle Fusion Partner Relationship Management Cloud Service
    Fusion Partner Relationship Management for Channel Managers Cloud Service
    Fusion Partner Relationship Management for Partners Cloud Service
    Fusion Territory Management for Channel Managers Cloud Service

    Oracle Fusion Customer Data Management Cloud Service
    Fusion Customer Data Steward Cloud Service
    Fusion Customer Management Foundation for Organizations Cloud Service
    Fusion Customer Management Foundation for Persons Cloud Service
    Fusion Data Quality Address Cleansing Cloud Service
    Fusion Data Quality Matching Cloud Service
    Oracle Fusion Human Capital Management Cloud Service
    Fusion Human Capital Management Base Cloud Service
    Fusion Transactional Business Intelligence for Human Capital Management Cloud Service

    Oracle Fusion Human Capital Management Cloud Service Options
    Fusion Global Payroll Cloud Service
    Fusion Goal Management Cloud Service
    Fusion Payroll Interface Cloud Service
    Fusion Performance Management Cloud Service
    Fusion Talent Review Cloud Service
    Fusion Workforce Compensation Cloud Service
    Fusion Workforce Lifecycle Manager Cloud Service
    Fusion Workforce Predictions Cloud Service

    Oracle Fusion Talent Management Cloud Service
    Fusion Talent Management Base Cloud Service
    Fusion Transactional Business Intelligence for Talent Management Cloud Service

    Oracle Fusion Talent Management Cloud Service Options
    Fusion Goal Management Cloud Service
    Fusion Performance Management Cloud Service
    Fusion Talent Review Cloud Service
    Fusion Workforce Compensation Cloud Service

    Oracle Fusion Financials Cloud Service
    Fusion Financials Cloud Service
    Fusion Expenses Cloud Service
    Fusion Advanced Collections Cloud Service
    Fusion Automated Invoice Processing Cloud Service
    Fusion Financial Reports Center Cloud Service
    Fusion Transactional Business Intelligence for Financials Cloud Service

    Oracle Fusion Procurement Cloud Service
    Fusion Purchasing Cloud Service
       Option: Fusion Supplier Portal Cloud Service
       Option: Fusion Sourcing Cloud Service
    Fusion Procurement Contracts Cloud Service
    Fusion Self Service Procurement Cloud Service
    Fusion Enterprise Contracts Base Cloud Service
    Fusion Transactional Business Intelligence for Procurement Cloud Service

    Oracle Fusion Project Financial Management Cloud Service
    Fusion Project Financial Management Base Cloud Service
    Fusion Project Control Cloud Service
    Fusion Project Billing Cloud Service
    Fusion Project Contracts Cloud Service
    Fusion Enterprise Contracts Base Cloud Service
    Fusion Project Performance Reporting Cloud Service
    Fusion Transactional Business Intelligence for Project Financial Management Cloud Service

    Oracle Fusion Project Execution Management Cloud Service
    Fusion Project Management Base Cloud Service
    Fusion Collaborative Project Management Cloud Service
    Fusion Transactional Business Intelligence for Project Execution Management Cloud Service
    Fusion Project Resource Management Cloud Service

    Oracle Fusion Risk and Control Management Cloud Service
    Fusion Risk and Control Management Base Cloud Service
    Option: Fusion Risk and Compliance Management Cloud Service
    Option: Fusion Risk and Compliance Intelligence Cloud Service
    Option: Finance Controls Cloud Service
    Option: Procurement Controls Cloud Service
    Option: Human Capital Controls Cloud Service
    Option: Fusion Controls On-Premise Connector Cloud Service

    Oracle Fusion Supply Chain Management Cloud Service
    Fusion Inventory Management Cloud Service
    Fusion Product Hub Cloud Service
    Fusion Transactional Business Intelligence for Supply Chain Management Cloud Service

    Oracle Hyperion Cloud Service
    Hyperion Planning Plus Cloud Service

    Oracle Fusion Cloud Service Additional Add-On
    Fusion Applications Extensibility Framework Cloud Service

    Oracle Fusion Financials
    Fusion Accounting Hub
    Fusion Advanced Collections
    Fusion Automated Invoice Processing
    Fusion Expenses
    Fusion Financial Reports Center
    Fusion Financials
    Fusion Transactional Business Intelligence for Financials

    Oracle Fusion Procurement
    Fusion Procurement Contracts
    Fusion Purchasing
    Option: Fusion Sourcing
    Option: Fusion Supplier Portal
    Fusion Self Service Procurement
    Fusion Transactional Business Intelligence for Procurement

    Oracle Fusion Project Portfolio Management
    Fusion Project Billing
    Fusion Project Contracts
    Fusion Project Control
    Fusion Project Costing
    Fusion Project Integration Gateway
    Fusion Project Performance Reporting
    Fusion Transactional Business Intelligence for Projects

    Oracle Fusion Human Capital Management
    Fusion Benefits
    Fusion Global Human Resources
    Fusion Global Payroll
    Fusion Global Payroll Interface
    Fusion Goal Management
    Fusion Performance Management
    Fusion Talent Review
    Fusion Transactional Business Intelligence for Human Capital Management
    Fusion Workforce Compensation
    Fusion Workforce Directory Management
    Fusion Workforce Lifecycle Manager
    Fusion Workforce Predictions

    Oracle Fusion Supply Chain Management
    Fusion Distributed Order Orchestration
    Fusion Distributed Order Orchestration User
    Fusion Global Order Promising
    Fusion Inventory Management
    Fusion Product and Catalog Management
    Fusion Product Hub
    Fusion Product Hub Data Steward
    Fusion Product Hub for Communications
    Fusion Product Hub for Retail
    Fusion Transactional Business Intelligence for Supply Chain Management

    Oracle Fusion Customer Relationship Management - Sales
    Fusion CRM Base
    Fusion CRM Desktop
    Fusion Enterprise Contracts Base
    Fusion Incentive Compensation
    Fusion Opportunity Landscape
    Fusion Quota Management
    Fusion Sales Campaigns
    Fusion Sales Catalog
    Fusion Sales Predictor
    Fusion Smart Phone Edition
    Fusion Territory Management
    Fusion Transactional Business Intelligence for Customer Relationship Management

    Oracle Fusion Customer Relationship Management - Marketing
    Fusion Email Marketing Server
    Fusion Marketing
    Fusion Marketing Segmentation - up to 500,000 records
    Fusion Marketing Segmentation - up to 1,000,000 records
    Fusion Marketing Segmentation - up to 3,000,000 records
    Fusion Marketing Segmentation - up to 5,000,000 records
    Fusion Marketing Segmentation - up to 10,000,000 records
    Fusion Marketing Segmentation - unlimited records

    Oracle Fusion Partner Relationship Management
    Fusion Incentive Compensation for Channel Managers
    Fusion Partner Relationship Management for Channel Managers
    Fusion Partner Relationship Management for Partners
    Fusion Territory Management for Channel Managers

    Oracle Fusion Customer Relationship Management - Customer Data Management
    Fusion Customer Hub Data Steward
    Fusion Customer Hub for Organizations
    Fusion Customer Management Foundation for Organizations
    Fusion Customer Hub for Persons
    Fusion Customer Management Foundation for Persons
    Fusion Data Quality Address Cleansing
    Fusion Data Quality Matching

    Oracle Fusion Application Tools
    Fusion Applications Extensibility Framework

    Oracle Fusion Governance, Risk and Compliance
    Fusion Application Access Controls Governor
    Option: Fusion Application Access Controls for Fusion Applications

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